Purim Mania!

A summary of Purim Happenings around Ann Arbor

The weeks leading up to Purim have been eventful; the Beit Sefer kids have been celebrating for two weeks now! Last week the children made Hamentaschen with the Hebrew Day School and this weekend they attended the Jewish Cultural Society’s Purim Festival. I think this year the students will have the whole story down before Friday Services!

But the fun doesn’t end there! There is still lots of Purim fun happening around town this week, culminating in our very own Purim service, Megillah reading, potluck, and games on Friday night!

AARC Purim Service, Potluck and Games. Friday, March 22nd, 6:30pm.

Our theme this year is “Dress Up As Your Personal Hero!” We will read the Megillah as a community after an abbreviated Shabbat service. After Megillah reading, we will hold a vegetarian community potluck followed by songs and games. We still need folks to sign up to read from the Megillah, bring Challah, and help clean up. Please sign up here!


Hamentaschen Making Party, Marcy Epstein’s House. Thursday, March 21st, 6:30-8:30pm.
Please join us for this fun event! We will bake hamentaschen for our Purim celebration and also make mishloach manot for friends and elders in our community. Friends will gather to share Purim stories, eat snacks, and celebrate the equinox and Worm Moon!! RSVP to Marcy at dr_marcy@hotmail.com; plan to bring a hamantaschen filling of your choice.

Other Purim events in the community this week:

Purim Dinner and Play at Beth Israel. Wednesday, March 20th, 6pm. Kick off your Purim celebration by watching the BIRS students perform their annual Purim Shpiel, to be followed by a family-friendly dinner. Children (high school aged and younger) are free; adults are $8.00 per person. Our menu is vegetarian chili and a baked potato bar! RSVP by Friday, March 15. Click here to sign up online.

Megillah Reading at Temple Beth Emeth, March 20th, 6pm.

Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue, March 20th, 6:30pm. This event will include a family-friendly celebration at 6:30 p.m. with pizza and hamantaschen, face painting, Purim games, and costumes galore!

Detroit Jews for Justice, March 19th 5-8pm.
This congregation is creating a short play, dance party, costume contest, and a beautiful spread of nosh (including hamentaschen of course).

Wow, that is a lot! I hope that everyone gets their fill of Purim fun. I look forward to seeing everyone this Friday. Chag Purim Sameach!

Radical Judaism with the AARC Book Group and Rabbi Ora

The AARC Book group invites you to join our upcoming discussion of a part of the book Radical Judaism: Rethinking God & Tradition, by Arthur Green, on Sunday, February 24, 2019 at 9:45am, at the home of Greg Saltzman and Audrey Newell. You can read the portion we will be discussing in this PDF file. It’s the preface, intro, and first chapter of the book.

Full details, including exact location, are found here. All are welcome. Please RSVP to Greg Saltzman at gsaltzman@albion.edu if you plan to attend.

Rabbi Ora will be leading our discussion of Radical Judaiasm. This is the second year in a row that Rabbi Ora has agreed to join the book group to lead a discussion on a text of her choosing.

We asked Rabbi Ora to provide background on the Arthur Green book. Below are her thoughts.

I first met Rabbi Art Green in February 2010 – after I’d decided to attend rabbinical school, but before I’d chosen RRC and was still considering Hebrew College as an option. At the time and now, ‘Art,’ as he’s often called, was the dean of Hebrew College. I don’t recall many details from the few hours I spent there in his presence – just an overall sense of warmth, joyfulness, and curiosity coming from him. Over the past 9 years, though, I’ve had the chance to study a number of his books, including Radical Judaism, of course, but also his Guide to the Zohar and his beautiful translation of R. Yehuda Leib Alter’s writings, Language of Truth: the Torah Commentary of the Sefat Emet.

I wanted our book group to get a taste of Radical Judaism because Art Green so artfully weaves together the theological with the personal. In the Introduction, he shares how he struggled with what some might call a ‘loss of faith,’ but what he calls ‘the pillars of naïve faith [giving] way’ as he came to reject a personal God in favor of a more pantheistic sense of holiness and unity in the world. Green describes how, as a teenager, he could ‘affirm neither particular providence nor a God who governed history,’ and writes: ‘…I am not a ‘believer’ in the conventional Jewish or Western sense. I simply do not encounter God as ‘He’ is usually described in the Western religious context, a Supreme Being or Creator who exists outside or beyond the universe, who created this world as an act of personal will, and who guides and protects it.’

Art Green’s process feels very Reconstructionist to me – both the God-wrestling, and the image of God that he ultimately settles on. Many of us raised in the Jewish tradition go through, at one time or another, a similar kind of wrestling. And that’s precisely what Reconstructionism invites us to do – to not just sit (comfortably or uncomfortably) with the beliefs that have been passed down to us, but to work towards a faith tradition that feels honest, spiritually nourishing, and even transcendent.

Rabbi Ora leading the book group in Feb. 2018. Please join us at Greg and Audrey’s house for the “second annual” on Feb. 24, 2019.

Art Green also has a powerful vision for the role that religion can play in shaping what he calls ‘this moment of transition in planetary and human history’ – a moment in which ‘unless we take drastic steps to change our way of living, our patterns of consumption, and our most essential understanding of our relationship to the world in which we exist, we are at great risk of destroying our earthly home and rendering it a wasteland.’ Art Green sees Judaism’s deep truths as tools to help us rise to these challenges.

We look forward to seeing you on Sunday, February 24. Be sure to RSVP to Greg at the email above. Happy reading!